The Gift that Keeps Giving to Attackers?

Lavern Vogel

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“This behavior, which dates back to Windows NT 4, is apparently by design and will not be remediated”

The patch for a severe privilege escalation vulnerability in Windows issued in May by Microsoft was bypassed within days and has had to be fixed again in August’s Patch Tuesday batch of software updates from Redmond.

May’s so called PrintDemon bug in Windows Print Spooler service lets an attacker — able to execute low-privileged code on a machine — establish a persistent backdoor, then return at any point and escalate privileges to SYSTEM.

The exploit involves a few short PowerShell commands and once the backdoor is set up, it will persist even after a patch for the vulnerability has been applied, as a detailed blog by the ZDI’s Simon Zuckerbraun notes.

The issue is one that should be firmly on the radar of CISOs, owing to the persistence of

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How Can We Get UK Innovation Back on Track?

Lavern Vogel

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“Why are we going backwards?”

Business innovation has been rapidly advancing over the last decade… or so we thought. Reading BEIS’ recent 2019 Innovation Report, we can see that innovation in UK companies fell in 2018 to the same levels as 2010, writes Neil Sholay, VP of Innovation, Oracle EMEA. Only 38% of companies were ‘innovation active’, a drastic fall from 49% in 2016. But why are we going backwards? Why has innovation become an uphill struggle? And how can the current crisis help us get it back on track?

In the last few months, I’ve been working with businesses large and small, helping them make adjustments to how their business runs – to weather the current storm, and become more resilient for the future. One of the most critical things I’ve learned is that from now on, it won’t always be about looking at major transformational

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Here’s What You Need to Know

Lavern Vogel

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“For some algorithms, loading the data can become computationally as expensive as using a classical algorithm to solve the problem”

AWS has launched a new fully managed quantum computing service that lets users start getting hands-on with some of the steadily improving technology’s very arcane algorithms — all without actually running a quantum machine itself. 

The new service has been dubbed “AWS Braket” and is available in three US regions. The hyperscaler said it is being experimented with by US biotech firm Amgen, Italian utility Enel, and Germany’s VW. It includes access to both a classically-powered quantum simulator, and a range of different actual quantum systems from Canada’s D-Wave, Washington DC-based startup IonQ, and Berkeley’s Rigetti.

(AWS is following Microsoft in offering cloud-based access to a curated portfolio of machines from third-party providers: Azure Quantum —  currently in limited preview — offers access to machines from IonQ,

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